What will the top 10 best-selling car brands look like in 2032? , Opinion – Car News

It is the year 2032, and half of the top 10 selling car brands in Australia are Chinese. Many of the top 10 of 2022 are nowhere to be seen. Gone is Ford, so is Mitsubishi, Mazda and Subaru. Some traditional brands remain. There are Toyota, Volkswagen, Nissan, Kia and Hyundai, but newcomers Haval, MG, BYD, Ora and Cherry have entered the top 10 with affordable, sexy electric vehicles winning over the Australian.

OK, we’re taking a wild stab in the dark here, but this scenario isn’t out of the realm of possibility.

Plus, this future is brought to you by the same author who predicted in a recently published story that Kanye West would reveal a car only for the rapper exactly three days later.

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Seriously, the next decade will see a significant change in the car brands Australians decide to give their money to. The conditions are now perfect for change.

Look, while car brand loyalty is still very high, it’s not to the extent most of us came from the Holden family or the Ford ones.

Holden and Ford didn’t adapt fast enough to our changing tastes and before we knew it, Australian manufacturing closed up shop.

The next decade will see a significant change in the car brands Australians decide to give their money to. The next decade will see a significant change in the car brands Australians decide to give their money to.

Toyota’s market-wide and decades-long dominance, the rebirth of Hyundai and Kia as desirable brands, and the emergence of the SUV as the preferred form of car presented Australians with other options. good options.

Tesla’s gatecrashing of the auto industry party further disrupted shopping habits. Here was the anti-car car company. The electric-only brand that has built the EV image from geek to beauty, from the Toyota Prius to the Model S.

So, with old loyalties broken and new brands from phones to drones open to the public, Chinese vehicles would be easy to adopt.

Some names are already familiar to Australians such as Haval and MG, others such as Ora and BYD will soon become famous.

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The top 10 brands in Australia from 1st to 10th at the end of June 2022 are: Toyota; Mazda, Mitsubishi, Kia, Hyundai, Ford, MG, Isuzu Ute, Subaru and Nissan.

With old loyalties broken and new brands from phones to drones open to the public, Chinese vehicles would be easy to adopt. With old loyalties broken and new brands from phones to drones open to the public, Chinese vehicles would be easy to adopt.

Chinese brand MG is already a top 10 player, but is it possible for Hav to join soon?

Great Wall Motors (GWM) is Haval’s parent company and its marketing chief Steve McIver ranks in the top 10, happening sooner rather than later.

“GWM’s recent growth has seen us move closer to the top 10 brands. And this is ultimately where we see our future.”

“With significant developments in the new product and a growing, professional dealer network, there is every chance of securing a top 10 spot in the years to come.

“By 2032? We expect to firmly establish itself in the top 10 with the widest model range and multiple electrification options. Australia is a very important market for GWM from a global perspective and our local ambitions match that.

This lack of power offering may be Mazda's downfall from the top 10.  (image: Tom White) This lack of power offering may be Mazda’s downfall from the top 10. (image: Tom White)

By 2032, the adoption of electric vehicles will be much higher than today. Of the passenger cars and SUVs sold so far this year, only 1.8 per cent were pure electric cars. Sounds small, but it is three times more than in the same period in 2021.

As more electric car brands enter the market, the automotive culture will change, with the rate of take up increasing rapidly. It is no madness to say that within 10 years at least thirty percent of new cars sold in Australia will be pure electric.

It makes sense that any brand that wants to be among the top 10 of 2032 should have a healthy electric vehicle line-up.

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The lack of electric offerings could be Mazda’s downfall from the top 10. The brand that has long been a top 10 player seems to have pursued better and better combustion engine technology when it can develop an electric vehicle. And so it’s late to the electric party that Hyundai, Kia and Toyota have been for a while.

Nissan is investing in strengthening its range and restocking its older models for new-generation versions starting with the X-Trail, Pathfinder and Z. Nissan was one of the first brands to bring electric vehicles to Australia with its Leaf, but it will need to produce more EV models to stay in the top 10 by 2032.

Chinese brand Cheri will make another attempt to win over Australians next year with two new arrivals. Chinese brand Cheri will make another attempt to win over Australians next year with two new arrivals.

GWM is also the parent company of the electric-only brand Ora, which is new to Australia and will be offering its Funky Cat for around $50,000.

But before that, Chinese brand BYD will touch the driveway price of $44,990 with its Atto 3 electric SUV in August 2022.

The Atto 3 MG joins the ZS EV, which has a driveaway price of $46,990, as the cheapest EV in Australia.

MG made its debut in the top 10 in March 2022 and maintained its position thanks to huge sales of all three of its models – MG3, MG ZS and MG HS.

Fellow Chinese brand Chery will make another attempt to conquer Australians next year with the arrival of the Tiggo7 Pro small SUV, the Tiggo8 Pro mid-size SUV and the Omoda5 EV.

Ora's Funky Cat is new to Australia and will set you back around $50,000. Ora’s Funky Cat is new to Australia and will set you back about $50,000.

Toyota has been in the EV game longer than any brand, but has primarily chosen to sell hybrids. Then in December last year, Toyota pulled back the curtain and revealed that it had 30 pure electric vehicles ready to go before 2030.

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Hyundai and Kia quickly and bravely forayed into the electric waters with sub-brands, the Ioniq and EV.

Volkswagen, the world’s second largest carmaker, is yet to launch a fully electric vehicle in Australia, but the brand is set to roll out EVs locally starting with the ID.4 and ID.5 SUVs in 2023. Ready, then ID.3 hatch in 2024.

The Volkswagen Group also owns Audi, koda and the new-to-Australia Cupra. Recently, the group’s managing director, Paul Samson, clarified his intentions for electricity.

“Volkswagen Group Australia’s goal of becoming a leader in EVs is by no means ambitious; it is simply realistic,” he said.

The Atto 3 MG joins the ZS EV, which has a driveaway price of $46,990, as the cheapest EV in Australia. The Atto 3 MG joins the ZS EV, which has a driveaway price of $46,990, as the cheapest EV in Australia.

“Volkswagen Group’s mission is to become the leading global provider of sustainable and personal mobility. By 2030, 50 percent of vehicles produced by Volkswagen Group will be EVs. By 2040 this will be close to 100 percent. By that time all of our global production plants are long overdue. will be carbon neutral. Our company will establish a single integrated battery model produced in its purpose-built factories. Volkswagen Group has earmarked $115 billion for the development of future technologies by 2025. This will account for approximately 50% of the company’s total investment. percentage is included.

It has been asked whether the conflict with China can affect the owners of Chinese cars? The answer is a confrontation with China that will affect all owners of all new cars. The lack of semiconductor chips is now causing huge delays in vehicles of all brands, Chinese or not, has proved this.

As far as the top 10 of 2032 are concerned, the beauty and danger of writing a story to be published on the internet is that it will be read in 2032. Time will tell.